Subscribe to Department of Homeland Security feed
DHS News and Updates
Updated: 2 hours 7 min ago

“If You See Something, Say Something®” Campaign Materials Are Available in 10 Languages

Thu, 07/22/2021 - 17:03

The U.S. Department of Homeland Security’s "If You See Something, Say Something®” campaign is committed to educating the American public about how to recognize and report the signs of suspicious activity. We believe everyone has a role to play in keeping our communities safe and secure. To effectively meet that mission, the Campaign must be accessible to all of the communities that we serve. 

To ensure equitable access to our campaign messages and materials, DHS expanded its public awareness campaign offerings this week. For the first time, “If You See Something, Say Something” materials are now available in 10 additional languages. These expanded offerings will help provide more equitable access to public safety information, and to promote an alert and informed American public. 

The new materials are available in Arabic, Chinese (Simplified), French, Haitian, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Thai, and Vietnamese and can be downloaded by the public from the translated outreach materials webpage. Each package of translated resources includes three sets of posters, two graphics for website or advertising use, and three social media graphics.  

The Department encourages individuals, organizations, and local government and public safety agencies to take advantage of these new offerings and share them in their communities and on social media.  

“If You See Something, Say Something®” is a national campaign that raises public awareness about the indicators of terrorism, terrorism-related crime, and domestic violent extremism, as well as the importance of reporting suspicious activity to state and local law enforcement. The Campaign regularly works with state, local, tribal and territorial partners across the country to distribute public awareness messaging throughout local communities, organizations, and on social media.  

Sample translated “If You See Something, Say Something®" campaign public awareness graphics:


English


Vietnamese


French


Chinese

Topics: Preventing Terrorism
Keywords: If You See Something Say Something, Public Service Announcement (PSA)

“If You See Something, Say Something®” Campaign Materials Are Available in 10 Languages

Thu, 07/22/2021 - 17:03

The U.S. Department of Homeland Security’s "If You See Something, Say Something®” campaign is committed to educating the American public about how to recognize and report the signs of suspicious activity. We believe everyone has a role to play in keeping our communities safe and secure. To effectively meet that mission, the Campaign must be accessible to all of the communities that we serve. 

To ensure equitable access to our campaign messages and materials, DHS expanded its public awareness campaign offerings this week. For the first time, “If You See Something, Say Something” materials are now available in 10 additional languages. These expanded offerings will help provide more equitable access to public safety information, and to promote an alert and informed American public. 

The new materials are available in Arabic, Chinese (Simplified), French, Haitian, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Thai, and Vietnamese and can be downloaded by the public from the translated outreach materials webpage. Each package of translated resources includes three sets of posters, two graphics for website or advertising use, and three social media graphics.  

The Department encourages individuals, organizations, and local government and public safety agencies to take advantage of these new offerings and share them in their communities and on social media.  

“If You See Something, Say Something®” is a national campaign that raises public awareness about the indicators of terrorism, terrorism-related crime, and domestic violent extremism, as well as the importance of reporting suspicious activity to state and local law enforcement. The Campaign regularly works with state, local, tribal and territorial partners across the country to distribute public awareness messaging throughout local communities, organizations, and on social media.  

Sample translated “If You See Something, Say Something®" campaign public awareness graphics:


English


Vietnamese


French


Chinese

Topics: Preventing Terrorism
Keywords: If You See Something Say Something, Public Service Announcement (PSA)

A Message from Secretary Alejandro N. Mayorkas on the Observance of Independence Day

Fri, 07/02/2021 - 06:10

Independence Day is an annual celebration of our history, our heritage, and our highest values. It is a time to recognize the day our country claimed its freedom and to renew the promise of our founding.

For nearly 250 years, the Declaration of Independence has stood as a beacon of our greatest aspirations. Like our country, it was never meant to be a finished product or a final word. Rather, it was designed as a charge and a challenge to each of us, a reminder that progress is not linear and that we bear a solemn responsibility to expand the reach of our ideals of equality, justice, life, and liberty in our time.

Here at the Department of Homeland Security, we can draw a direct line from those days in Philadelphia in 1776 to our work today. We share the same commitment – to take part in the great project of preserving democracy, delivering justice, engaging in the constant effort of improvement, and defending our people and our values.

I am proud to serve with all of you – the people of DHS – who have devoted yourselves to protecting our homeland. Freedom has historically come at great cost, and I am grateful for your sacrifice.

This Fourth of July, as the fireworks cast a spectrum of color in the sky, please take the time to reflect on the birth of our nation and the precious legacy of liberty we enjoy. Please also reflect with great pride on your contributions to the endurance of our ideals.

Happy Independence Day.

 

Alejandro N. Mayorkas

Secretary of Homeland Security

With honor and integrity, we will safeguard the American people, our homeland, and our values.

Topics: Secretary of Homeland Security
Keywords: Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas

Secretary Mayorkas' Remarks on World Refugee Day

Mon, 06/21/2021 - 10:00

World Refugee Day was Sunday, June 20th. Watch Secretary Mayorkas deliver remarks honoring refugees across the globe.

View Original Topics: Secretary of Homeland Security
Keywords: Refugee, Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas

Message from Secretary Mayorkas on the Observance of Juneteenth

Thu, 06/17/2021 - 13:08

Colleagues,

Today, President Biden will sign the Juneteenth National Independence Day Act commemorating Juneteenth as a federal holiday. As June 19 falls on a Saturday this year, federal employees will observe this holiday tomorrow, June 18, 2021.

Juneteenth, also known as “Freedom Day” and “Emancipation Day,” is a significant day in our history. On June 19, 1865, two and a half years after the Emancipation Proclamation was signed, federal troops rode into Galveston, Texas to inform enslaved people that they were indeed free. Juneteenth is a time to celebrate the end of slavery, to reflect on the shameful and enduring legacy of racism in our country, and to commit to doing better.

We must remain relentless in our pursuit of both equality and equity. Slavery was a stain on this Nation that left a legacy of systemic racism, oppression, and the marginalization of the African American community.

While Juneteenth becoming a federal holiday is a momentous step for our Nation, we still have more work to do. The impacts of slavery are still experienced across our country today, including through disparate access to healthcare, quality education, and economic opportunity. 

Our Department’s mission is to safeguard the American people, our homeland, and our values. To truly embody and execute this critical mission, we must protect the civil and human rights of all Americans. This year, the Biden-Harris Administration has begun the process of building a more diverse, equitable, and inclusive federal government. At DHS, we work to ensure our policies are informed by the communities we serve every day. We also remain committed to ensuring our Department looks like America, including by investing in the development of diverse talent pipelines and ensuring equitable access to professional advancement opportunities. We recognize that we still have much more work to do and we will continue to strive to build a more equitable, just, and inclusive future. 

We all have a role to play in building a better America today and for future generations. Please join me in committing to advancing racial justice and racial equity across our Nation, not only on Juneteenth, but every day of the year.

Thank you for everything you do in service to our Department and our country. 

Sincerely,

Alejandro N. Mayorkas
Secretary of Homeland Security

 

With honor and integrity, we will safeguard the American people, our homeland, and our values.

Topics: Homeland Security Enterprise
Keywords: Employee

On DACA’s Anniversary, A Renewed Opportunity

Tue, 06/15/2021 - 09:38

This op-ed originally appeared in USA Today on June 15, 2021.

Right now in a community somewhere in the United States, parents are explaining to their daughter what it means that she does not have “papers.” They explain to her that, even though she came here as a toddler and she has known no country but ours, her lack of documentation brings fragility to the opportunities they hope will be hers, to the future she will build for herself, and to the dreams she already has.

They will point to the recipients of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals who took care of her in the hospital, who teach her at school, who usher her in church, and they will explain that these wonderful young people face the same uncertainties in their tomorrows. The daughter will not understand why that is so, and neither should we.

On June 15 we celebrate DACA’s ninth anniversary. This extraordinarily successful policy has transformed the lives of hundreds of thousands of young “Dreamers” by making them eligible for work authorization and providing a measure of protection from deportation. This anniversary must propel Congress to finally pass the permanent legislative protections that would give Dreamers the opportunity to earn citizenship – so that they can live their lives with true certainty, free from fear.

DACA offers stability and opportunity

Since it was announced in 2012, DACA has been grounded primarily in the Department of Homeland Security’s well-established authority to exercise prosecutorial discretion. For more than 825,000 people who have benefited, the policy has created the opportunity to live more freely and to invest in themselves and their communities more fully, without the fear of being ripped away from the only home they know.

These young people grew up in our neighborhoods, studied with our children in school, played on the same sports teams, and celebrated decades of birthdays and holidays here in the United States. In fact, many DACA recipients grew up not knowing that they weren’t citizens because they were American in every way except on paper. When they sought driver’s licenses or applied to college, many learned of their status for the first time, and the limitless opportunities they dreamed of suddenly dimmed.

Thanks to DACA, these young people have built their lives in our shared country, started families and launched careers. They have lived in America on average for more than two decades.In fact, no person who now has DACA has lived in this country for less than 14 years, and on average they were 6 years old when they arrived.

More than 250,000 U.S. citizen children have a parent who is a DACA recipient.Nearly one-third of all DACA recipients are essential workers, like doctors, nurses, farmworkers, and food service providers helping our communities survive and recover from the pandemic. This issue is personal to me because I had the great privilege of helping the Obama-Biden administration create and implement DACA when I served as the Director of U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services. Years of tireless work from Dreamers themselves made clear that we needed to take every step possible to provide deserving young people with some degree of protection and continued opportunity to work and support their families.

I am proud of the effectiveness with which we were able to implement the policy, working with advocates to make a real-life impact on so many. I continue to be proud of the steps the department is taking, at the direction of President Joe Biden, to do everything in our power to continue to protect DACA recipients and help them thrive. Today, our department is working hard to advance the president’s directive that we preserve and fortify DACA, and we are making swift progress in our rulemaking efforts.

But the simple truth is that while DACA has been overwhelmingly successful for all our families and communities, it is not a permanent protection. That fact was made painfully clear during the last administration, which placed DACA and Dreamers themselves under constant threat.

Give Dreamers same chances I had 

It is a priority for this administration to help these hard-working young people and millions of others like them. To deliver to Dreamers the certainty they deserve, President Biden put forward the U.S. Citizenship Act on his very first day in office, and he has urged the Senate to pass the Dream and Promise Act and Farmworker Modernization Act. Both bills have already passed the House with bipartisan support. These measures would help secure the chance to earn citizenship for millions of undocumented individuals, including DACA recipients and younger Dreamers whom the previous administration blocked from applying for the program. 

It is long past time for Congress to come together and pass permanent protections for these young people. The majority of Americans agree. Until that happens, we in the Department of Homeland Security will continue to exercise our discretion as the law provides and deliver some measure of relief, however tenuous it may be. 

I understand the hope of so many of the Dreamers I have had the privilege of meeting. I came to the United States with my family when I was one year old. We came as refugees from Cuba seeking the safety and freedom that my parents knew we could only find here in America. Because there was a pathway to citizenship that allowed me to secure legal status, I had the unbridled chance to work hard and build a life and a family here. 

The opportunity to earn citizenship was vital to my success in this country, and today it is my highest honor to be able to serve my country as the Secretary of Homeland Security. Citizenship made this possible for me, and my own story is not so different from that of the many young people who hold DACA right now. It is long past time for them to be able to earn citizenship, too. On this ninth anniversary, we recommit to this renewed opportunity and to putting the American dream within reach of the young people who are Dreamers. 

Topics:
Keywords: Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA), Immigration, Immigration Reform, Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas

Message from Secretary Alejandro N. Mayorkas on the Observance of Memorial Day

Fri, 05/28/2021 - 06:42

Colleagues,

This Memorial Day, we honor our fellow Americans who have made the ultimate sacrifice in service to our Nation.

Memorial Day is a day of remembrance and mourning. We remember and grieve the loss of friends and loved ones who gave their lives protecting our rights and freedoms. Memorial Day is also a day of profound gratitude. We reflect on the legacy of selfless service and express our everlasting thanks.

I extend my condolences to those of you who, on Memorial Day, mourn the loss of a hero.

Nearly half of our DHS colleagues have served or continue to serve in uniform. They are heroes too.

This Memorial Day, please join me in reflecting on the military personnel who have sacrificed everything for our country. Please dedicate a moment of silence in their honor.

I am honored and privileged to serve alongside you. Thank you for all you do.

Sincerely,

Alejandro N. Mayorkas
Secretary of Homeland Security

With honor and integrity, we will safeguard the American people, our homeland, and our values.

Topics: Secretary of Homeland Security
Keywords: Employee Resource

DHS Recognizes Ramadan In Virtual Event with Muslim Community Leaders

Wed, 05/12/2021 - 11:51

The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) has a long-standing history of engagement with diverse ethnic and faith-based communities, including Muslim communities. In recognition of Ramadan, Secretary of Homeland Security Alejandro N. Mayorkas joined a virtual roundtable discussion with leaders within the Muslim community, including national and local advocacy and social service organizations. The event was hosted by the DHS Office for Civil Rights and Civil Liberties (CRCL) and featured remarks by both Secretary Mayorkas and CRCL Officer Katherine Culliton-González, along with DHS Senior Counselor Kamal Essaheb and CRCL Senior Advisor Brenda Abdelall. This virtual engagement was held in place of the annual Iftar reception hosted by the Department, a tradition which began in 2011.

Secretary Mayorkas acknowledged the leaders participating in the event and their organizations for the critical work they do in communities, particularly to ensure that new U.S. citizens have access to critical services. He noted his concern with the rise in domestic violent extremism and hate incidents that target the Muslim community. Secretary Mayorkas also recognized that many Muslims serve at DHS and across the federal government and thanked them for their service.

DHS has a long-standing history of engagement with diverse ethnic and faith-based communities, including Muslim communities. And on his first day in office, President Biden issued the “Proclamation on Ending Discriminatory Bans on Entry to the United States” to reverse the cruel “Muslim Ban” implemented by the prior Administration and other harmful policies that impacted the Muslim community. CRCL leads the Department’s community engagement efforts by hosting regular meetings in 18 cities across the country that include community leaders, federal, state, and local government officials, and all levels of law enforcement.  These roundtables facilitate important dialogue with diverse American communities who feel their civil rights may be affected by DHS activities and programs. 

While Ramadan ends today, DHS’s engagement with the Muslim communities will continue. In carrying out the DHS mission to protect our homeland, DHS will continue to protect the diverse communities that make up the fabric of America.

Learn more about the Department of Homeland Security’s Office for Civil Rights and Civil Liberties.

Topics: Civil Rights and Civil Liberties
Keywords: Community Engagement, Faith Based, Office for Civil Rights and Civil Liberties (CRCL)